Prepare Your Car:  

  • Keep your gas tank at least half full. 
  • Creating a winter car kit and place in the trunk of the car. This includes: windshield scraper and small broom, flashlight, spare radio with batteries, snacks or energy-type food, water, jumper cables, flares and matches, shovel, sand or shingles to give tires traction, extra hats, socks and mittens, first aid kit, and fluorescent distress flag.
  • Check the following items on your car: 
    • Antifreeze levels
    • Battery and ignition
    • Brakes
    • Exhaust system
    • Fuel and air filters
    • Heater and defroster
    • Lights and flashing hazard lights
    • Oil
    • Thermostat
    • Windshield wiper equipment
    • Tires

If you or your area sustains damage, alert your Emergency Warden. First Responders and Building Management will assist you as soon as possible.

In the event of Severe Weather or Tornado occurs:  

  • Assign people within your office to relocate all occupants to the core areas of the building (Areas of Refuge such as lowest level of the Building, stairwells, inner corridors, or restrooms) as quickly as possible.  
  • Employees should leave exterior offices and close the door.  
  • Stay away from exterior windows and the perimeter of the building. 
  • Sit down and protect yourself by putting your head as close to your lap as possible, or kneel protecting your head. 
  • Employees should stay away from the main lobby and entry ways.
  • Remain in your area of refuge until the “All Clear” has been issued by the National Weather Service. 
  • Do not use elevators during your company’s relocation process within the Building. 
  • If your company decides to evacuate the Building, the Tenant's Emergency Warden or otherwise designated person, should notify the Building Management office of your intention to do so. Evacuate via stairway in a severe weather evacuation. 
  • Assign people within your office to make certain that all members of your staff have evacuated safely.
  • Notify Building Management or security of all leaks, fires, and structural or other damage during or after the storm. 

If you are caught in transit in the building:

  • Assign people within your office to relocate all occupants to the core areas of the building (Areas of Refuge such as lowest level of the Building, stairwells, inner corridors, or restrooms) as quickly as possible.  
  • Employees should leave exterior offices and close the door.  
  • Stay away from exterior windows and the perimeter of the building. 
  • Sit down and protect yourself by putting your head as close to your lap as possible, or kneel protecting your head. 
  • Employees should stay away from the main lobby and entry ways.
  • Remain in your area of refuge until the “All Clear” has been issued by the National Weather Service. 
  • Do not use elevators during your company’s relocation process within the Building. 
  • If your company decides to evacuate the Building, the Tenant's Emergency Warden or otherwise designated person, should notify the Building Management office of your intention to do so. Evacuate via stairway in a severe weather evacuation. 
  • Assign people within your office to make certain that all members of your staff have evacuated safely.
  • Notify Building Management or security of all leaks, fires, and structural or other damage during or after the storm. 

If you are caught in an perimeter office:

  • Seek shelter under your desk.
  • If safe to do so, remain in the area until the "All Clear" has been given National Weather Service, your Emergency Warden or Building Management.
  • Weather Advisory, Watch & Warnings 
  • In the Event of Severe Weather / Tornado...
  • Winter Weather

Advisory

  • Less hazardous weather conditions or less specific locations
  • Weather may still pose significant inconvenience, damage or injury.
  • Situations are possible that could threaten life or property.

Watch

  • Weather conditions are favorable for a hazardous weather event.
  • Stay alert to changing conditions.
  • Make alternate plans.
  • Be aware of possible shelter and/or evacuation routes.

WARNING

  • A dangerous weather event is occurring or imminent.
  • Likely significant threat to life or property.
  • Take protective action immediately.

Severe Weather & Tornado

Severe weather may include rain, hail, tornadoes, high winds, ice, sleet and snow, excessive heat, etc.  When severe weather occurs, remain calm and always use your best judgment, because it may be difficult to predict what situation may arise due to a weather related emergency.  Local authorities may issue a severe weather warning by radio or civil defense sirens. 

 

Public warning sirens operated by Hennepin County and the City are designed to be heard outside, and may not be heard inside the building. Building Management strongly recommends that each Tenant also have a weather radio to monitor severe weather warnings and a plan of action in place for dealing with severe weather, both during and after business hours, for the safety of their employees. 


For weather information you may visit the National Weather Service’s website at www.nws.noaa.gov.

 Safety Tips for Safer Travel Outdoors:  

A few simple measures can make it safer to walk outdoors in the winter. Avoiding snow and ice, putting and wearing the right footwear all make a big difference.

  • Choose a good pair of winter boots. For warmth and stability look for these features:
    • Insulated and waterproof
    • thick, non-slip tread sole
    • wide, low heels
    • lightweight.
  • Bring out those hands!

          Hold it! Don’t remove those gloves or mittens yet. Think twice before walking outside with your hands in your pockets.

          Why? Keeping your hands in your pockets increases the risk of you falling or completely losing your balance in case you                      slip while walking on ice or snow. 

  • Mittens VS. Gloves

    Gloves sure look fashionable but donning mittens can actually save your digits. With your fingers touching each other   inside mittens, they generate more body heat than when they are inside gloves. 

  • Dress in Layers

          Prevent heat loss by wearing a warm hat, scarf, and mittens or gloves. Dressing in layers may also keep you warmer.

Plan Ahead for Winter:  

Stay Informed:

  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio to stay informed of winter weather watches and warnings. 
  • Also monitor commercial radio, television and the Internet. 

​​

Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a winter storm hazard:

  • Freezing Rain - Rain that freezes when it hits the ground, creating a coating of ice on roads, walkways, trees and power lines.
  • Sleet - Rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground. Sleet also causes moisture on roads to freeze and become slippery.
  • Winter Weather Advisory - Winter weather conditions are expected to cause significant inconveniences and may be hazardous. When caution is used, these situations should not be life threatening.
  • Winter Storm Watch - A winter storm is possible in your area. 
  • Winter Storm Warning - A winter storm is occurring or will soon occur in your area.
  • Blizzard Warning - Sustained winds or frequent gusts to 35 miles per hour or greater and considerable amounts of falling or blowing snow (reducing visibility to less than a quarter mile) are expected to prevail for a period of three hours or longer.
  • Frost/Freeze Warning - Below freezing temperatures are expected.

Winter Weather  

Winter storms can range from a moderate snow over a few hours to a blizzard with blinding, wind-driven snow that lasts for several days. Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures and sometimes by strong winds, icing, sleet and freezing rain and/or fog. 

 

One of the primary concerns of winter weather storms is the ability to knock out heat, power and communications services to your  home or office, sometimes for days at a time. Heavy snowfall and extreme can immobilize an entire region. 

 

The National Weather Service refers to winter storms as the “Deceptive Killers” because most deaths are indirectly related to the storm. Instead, people are injured or killed in traffic accidents, hypothermia or frostbite from prolonged exposure to the cold.  It is important to be prepared for winter weather before it strikes. 

A number of detailed resources can be found at NOAA, such as their preparedness guide "Winter Storms - The Deceptive Killer" .

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